Sh*t clients ask us to do with their presentations (vol. 2). And what you can learn from it

Sh*t clients ask us to do with their presentations (vol. 2). And what you can learn from it

Maybe you caught our last edition of “Sh*t Clients Ask….” Maybe you loved it. Maybe you didn’t. Doesn’t matter. Here’s another one, it’s catharsis for us. Here’s another 4 heinous client requests and the reasons they never should have aksed in the first place.

Sh*t clients ask us to do with their presentations (vol. 1). And what you can learn from it

Sh*t clients ask us to do with their presentations (vol. 1). And what you can learn from it

Ah it has come to this! There is always a point, in any blog in the creative industry, when the creativity runs a little dry. At that point it’s always seems that a venting happens and the inevitable “Sh*t our clients say” comes out.

There is an ideal length for a presentation. TEDx has already worked it out.

There is an ideal length for a presentation. TEDx has already worked it out.

Doesn’t matter who you are or how life-changing your area of expertise is you’ve only got 18 minutes tops to give a TED talk. This is no arbitrary number there’s science behind it. Science you can put towards giving a winning pitch or presentation.

A surplus of information creates a paucity of attention.

A surplus of information creates a paucity of attention.

When I see detail on an early slide in the deck, and a hint that much more detail is to come, I have a predictably uncomfortable reaction. My instinct is to flee, because my primitive brain is lazy and wants to conserve energy for survival and procreation, not try and understand or remember all of the bullet points, data and graphs that are being unleashed.

Storytelling and why testimonials work.

Storytelling and why testimonials work.

The brain works in strange ways, right? You have to repeat a phone number over and over in your head to remember it, but you can recall a funny joke or a news story pretty easily. Why? Because that’s the way the human brain works. 

Where people look in an elevator is important to understand how to make presentations interesting.

Where people look in an elevator is important to understand how to make presentations interesting.

Long title, right? But it got your attention and you’re reading this. Now ask yourself this: Have you ever been in an elevator with other people and looked up? Chances are you have and you’ll probably know that if you look at something everyone else will too. 

Aim for awe. You’ll win. 100% guaranteed.

Aim for awe. You’ll win. 100% guaranteed.

Humans are pretty good at making ‘incredible’, but Nature is the ultimate when it comes to creating ‘awe’. Awe is what you feel when you break through a clearing and see a snow covered mountain, or a violent storm creates lightning and thunder overhead,  or you gaze down into a deep canyon from a dangerous ridge, or a whale breaches just meters from your boat. 

Cocaine and the science of attention.

Cocaine and the science of attention.

Deep down humans are still animals. And understanding how animal survival instincts work gives you a real edge when you are creating presentations and selling your offer. The same basic responses and needs that helped our ancestors survive when they were primordial fish things still govern our behaviour today.